Commit 5d0ead1f authored by Turnhout, M.C. van's avatar Turnhout, M.C. van
Browse files

update for new pics location

parent cab434c2
......@@ -141,9 +141,9 @@ Further note that this is now an \textsl{approximation} of the exact optical den
\begin{figure}[h]
\tiny
\subfloat[\label{notlogzeroA}]{%
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{../pics/notlogzeroA}}\hfill
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{pics/notlogzeroA}}\hfill
\subfloat[\label{notlogzerodA}]{%
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{../pics/notlogzerodA}}\\
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{pics/notlogzerodA}}\\
\caption{Comparison of the exact and approximated absorbance. With \textbf{(a)} exact absorbance (equation \ref{Apixel}, solid blue) and approximated absorbance (equation \ref{Apixela}, dashed red) as a function of pixel value $I_p$ for an 8-bits image ($I_\mathrm{max} = 255$); and \textbf{(b)} the relative error as a function of pixel value $I_p$ for 8-bits (blue), 12-bits ($I_\mathrm{max} = 4095$, red) and 16-bits images ($I_\mathrm{max} = 65\,535$, yellow).
\label{Apixelcompare}}
\end{figure}
......
......@@ -43,14 +43,14 @@ Photons do not have have a colour: there are no `green' photons or `blue photons
\begin{figure}[h]
\def\svgwidth{\linewidth}
\tiny
\includesvg{../pics/visiblespectrum}
\includesvg{pics/visiblespectrum}
\caption{The `visible spectrum' ranges from wavelengths of about 400\,nm to about 700\,nm. Photon energy (white line in the spectrum) is $E = \frac{hc}{\lambda}$with $h=6.63\cdot 10^{-34}$\,Js (Planck's constant), $c \equiv 299\,792\,458$\,m/s (the speed of light, by definition), and $\lambda$: the wavelength of the light.\label{spectrum}}
\end{figure}
In our eyes, we have four variations of light sensitive cells, three variations for `colour vision'. Each variation is most sensitive to a particular and different range of photon energies (or wavelengths, figure \ref{eyeRGB}). When photons with a energy of about $4.42\cdot 10^{-19}$\,J (450\,nm) enter the eye, it is mostly/only one of the variations that responds and we say: `blue'.
\begin{figure}[h]
\center
\includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{../pics/Murphy2012_fig0208.png}\\
\includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{pics/Murphy2012_fig0208.png}\\
\caption{The human eye has variations of light sensitive cells. The three different `cone' cells have peak sensitivities for blue, green and red and form an `RGB'-scheme for colour vision. In the dark, the cone cells do not respond anymore (too little photons) and we get our information from the `rod' cells. These `rod' cells come only in one variation (`rhodopsin'), and thus `colour'. What they lack in wavelength discrimination however, they make up in sensitivity: about $40\times$ as good as that of the `cones'. Figure taken from \cite[figure 2.8]{Murphy2012}.\label{eyeRGB}}
\end{figure}
......@@ -66,9 +66,9 @@ Hence: `white light contains all colours'. And indeed, when the R, G and B chann
Yet, when you mix red, green and blue paint together, you do not get white paint. The difference is that between additive and subtractive colour mixing (figure \ref{colourmixing}).\\
\begin{figure}[h]
\subfloat[\label{colouradd}]{%
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{../pics/ColourAdd}}\hfill
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{pics/ColourAdd}}\hfill
\subfloat[\label{coloursub}]{%
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{../pics/ColourSub}}\\
\def\svgwidth{0.47\linewidth}\includesvg{pics/ColourSub}}\\
\caption{Colour mixing: the secondary colours of additive mixing are the primary colours for subtractive mixing, vice versa. With \textbf{(a)} additive (RGB, screens, cameras, eye, fluorescence), and \textbf{(b)} subtractive (paint, printing, ink, histology). \label{colourmixing}}
\end{figure}
......@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ In other words: we have to switch from `transmission space' (Intensity, RGB) to
It get worse: the relation ship between transmission and absorption is not linear. If a certain amount of pigment absorbs 10\,\% of the light, and I double the amount of pigment, then\dots\ intensity is not $100\,\% - 2\cdot 10\,\% = 80\,\%$, but $(100\,\% - 10\,\%)^2 = 81\,\%$.
\begin{figure}[b!]
\tiny
\def\svgwidth{\linewidth}\includesvg{../pics/taintedglass}
\def\svgwidth{\linewidth}\includesvg{pics/taintedglass}
\caption{Decrease of intensity through increasing amounts of tainted sheets of glass is exponential. Each bar represents a sheet of glass of 1\,cm that absorbs 10\,\% of the light and the height and grey value of the bars are scaled with the intensity of the light after the sheet that it represents (i.e.\ the first bar has height and intensity 0.9 because 10\,\% of the light is absorbed by this first sheet). When you make the bars thinner and thinner, you will end up with the blue line $I = 0.9^x$ that describes intensity as function of glass thickness $x$.\label{taintedglass}}
\end{figure}
......
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
% graphics and color
\usepackage[pdftex]{graphicx}
\graphicspath{{../pics/}}
\graphicspath{{pics/}}
\usepackage{svgimport}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\definecolor{ispurple}{RGB}{128,0,128}
......
clear all; close all;
% read image
im = imread('pics/Flag_of_Jamaica.png');
% image colours
dyes = [254 209 0; % yellow
0 155 58 % green
0 0 0]'; % black
im = imread('pics/Flag_of_Jamaica.png');
% do the deconvolve
[amounts, P, Q, R, RGB, A, K, iOD] = cld_decon(dyes, im, 'rgb');
% show image
figure
imshow(im)
figure
imshow(uint8(P))
figure
imshow(uint8(Q))
figure
imshow(uint8(R))
for d = 1:3
figure
imagesc(amounts(:, :, d))
imshow(amounts(:, :, d)/norm(A(:, d)))
colormap(gray)
colorbar
end
figure
imshow(uint8(P))
figure
imshow(uint8(Q))
figure
imshow(uint8(R))
figure
imshow(uint8(RGB))
......
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