Commit 77e2e21c authored by Mark van Turnhout's avatar Mark van Turnhout
Browse files

update of chapter quotes

parent c16bff69
......@@ -42,6 +42,20 @@ Richard~P. Feynman.
\newblock \emph{{QED} -- the strange theory of light and matter}.
\newblock Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 2006.
\bibitem{Galilei1632}
Galileo Galilei.
\newblock \emph{{D}ialogue {C}oncerning the {T}wo {C}hief {W}orld {S}ystems:
{P}tolemaic and {C}opernican}.
\newblock Modern Library, New York, U.S.A., 1991.
\newblock Translation of \textsl{Dialogo sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo}
(1632) by Stillman Drake.
\bibitem{Harre2009}
Rom Harr{\'e}.
\newblock \emph{{P}avlov's {D}ogs and {S}chr{\"o}dinger's {C}at: {S}cenes from
the living laboratory}.
\newblock Oxford University Press, 2009.
\bibitem{Loerakker2011a}
S.~Loerakker, E.~Manders, G.J. Strijkers, K.~Nicolay, F.P.T. Baaijens, D.L.
Bader and C.W.J. Oomens.
......
......@@ -111,13 +111,18 @@
\include{buildfem}
\def\bibname{References}
%\begin{savequote}
%I have pointed out these things because the more you see how strangely Nature behaves, the harder it is to make a model that explains how even the simplest phenomena actually work. So theoretical physics has given up on that. \qauthor{Richard P.\ Feynman \cite{Feynman2006} }
%\end{savequote}
\begin{savequote}
I have pointed out these things because the more you see how strangely Nature behaves, the harder it is to make a model that explains how even the simplest phenomena actually work. So theoretical physics has given up on that. \qauthor{Richard P.\ Feynman \cite{Feynman2006} }
\end{savequote}
\bibliographystyle{myplainhp}
\bibliography{jabref}
\clearpage
\begin{savequote}
I see that you have hitherto been one of that herd who, in order to learn how matters such as this take place, and in order to acquire a knowledge of natural effects, do not betake themselves to ships or crossbows or cannons, but retire into their studies and glance through an index and a table of contents to see whether Aristotle has said anything about them; and, being assured of the true sense of his text, consider that nothing else can be known. \qauthor{Galileo Galilei \cite{Galilei1632} }
\end{savequote}
\addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{\protect\numberline{\color{white}}Index}
\printindex
......
% !TeX root = BasilLab.tex
\begin{savequote}
In the computer model, all the microfilaments were given certain quantitative properties with names that mean something to physicists: a `viscous damping coefficient' and an `elastic spring constant'. Never mind exactly what these mean: they are the kind of things physicists like to measure in a spring. \qauthor{Richard Dawkins \cite{Dawkins2009}}
\end{savequote}
I can't be as confident about computer science as I can about biology. Biology easily has 500\,years of exciting problems to work on. It's at that level.
\qauthor{Donald Knuth, Computer Literacy Bookshops Interview (1993)}
\end{savequote}
\chapter{\bas{buildFEM}}\label{buildfem}
In this chapter we discuss the core of BasilLab: \bas{buildFEM} and its ouput \texttt{basil<basilid>\_job.py\index{basil<basilid>\_job.py@\texttt{basil<basilid>\_job.py}}}.
......
% !TeX root = BasilLab.tex
\begin{savequote}
I have pointed out these things because the more you see how strangely Nature behaves, the harder it is to make a model that explains how even the simplest phenomena actually work. So theoretical physics has given up on that. \qauthor{Richard P.\ Feynman \cite{Feynman2006} }
In the computer model, all the microfilaments were given certain quantitative properties with names that mean something to physicists: a `viscous damping coefficient' and an `elastic spring constant'. Never mind exactly what these mean: they are the kind of things physicists like to measure in a spring. \qauthor{Richard Dawkins \cite{Dawkins2009}}
\end{savequote}
\chapter{Conventions}
\section{Spatial dimensions}
......@@ -44,4 +45,4 @@ Thus, for the experiment performed on June 11\ap{th} 2015
\item[the link] between `\texttt{<basilid> = 140611}' and `raw MRI-data is stored in \texttt{<MRI-root>/140611.qd1/}' is hard-coded in \texttt{bas\_getMeta.m}
\end{description}
\noindent BasilLab provides \bas{setMRIroot} to set \MRIroot{}, and \bas{setDataRoot} to set \basilhome{} (see section \ref{basilini}).
\ No newline at end of file
\noindent BasilLab provides \bas{setMRIroot} to set \MRIroot{}, and \bas{setDataRoot} to set \basilhome{} (see section \ref{basilini}).
% !TeX root = BasilLab.tex
\begin{savequote}
In the computer model, all the microfilaments were given certain quantitative properties with names that mean something to physicists: a `viscous damping coefficient' and an `elastic spring constant'. Never mind exactly what these mean: they are the kind of things physicists like to measure in a spring. \qauthor{Richard Dawkins \cite{Dawkins2009}}
Modelling is a scientific technique that requires a good deal of intuition and insight to be really effective. Nevertheless, it is the most powerful tool available to the experimenter from the instrumentarium. \qauthor{Rom Harr{\'e} \cite{Harre2009}}
\end{savequote}
\chapter{Work flow}
......
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